Seaside

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Sea Island, Ga…. sometime in the late 80’s. My wife and I were spending a long weekend celebrating our wedding anniversary when I spotted this bird sitting on the dock piling. Those were film days, long before digital. You had to compose, run some calculations through your head, set the camera and…. wait until the film is processed and proofed to know if you got your shot. I was able to fire off 3 frames before the bird took offense at me being there, this was the middle image.

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Maui at night

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This photo was shot 13 years ago with a early design digital camera. I know it was taken on the island of Maui, Hawaii and I think, pretty sure, seem to remember it was a night shot. But, it’s digital and we live in the world of Photoshop. Maybe it was a sunset, or sunrise and I was goofing around some years ago in Photoshop. Guess I’ll have to check the RAW file but I kinda like it as a night image, full moon shining on the sea….

Old Fort, old ways

Fort.jpgBack in 1983 I visited this Civil war Fort with my fiancé, we did the tourist thing and walked around reading the plaques and taking photos. Only then it was all film.

Digging around in a closet last week I found the transparency laying on the floor, it had fallen out of it’s storage glassene and ended up on the dark floor where it has been stepped on… apparently multiple times. Accidents happen and I do have multiple frames of the image so in the end I haven’t lost much.

It did remind me of all the ups and downs of living in the film world…you shot a lot less (each shot cost money), composed the image a lot longer and didn’t see the images until days or weeks later. Unless you had a polaroid attachment, you did not have a instant view of the image — you had to rely on your training, instincts or experience (whichever was greater) to get a good photo. Manipulation of the image was usually limited to what you could do IN FRONT of the lens, not after in a computer.

That fact in itself made me — a professional — a viable entity in the world. Natural talent combined with the understanding of the mysterious “dark room” and proper training provided myself and my peers with work and job security.  Nowadays, a cell phone and multiple graphic apps or a DSLR set on auto will give anyone a pretty good image lowering the need to hire a professional. My profession is a victim of the very technology I love.